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Monday, February 2, 2015

My Salt Came From Where???


Pink, white or gray?  I know it's fashionable to use a fancy grinder for your salt and even choose a cute color... but... I have to ask where does your salt of choice come from, and do you really want to support that particular economy?

The minerals contained in the top three healthiest salt choices are trace minerals that our bodies need to function properly, and all of the choices below contain them.  (I have no affiliation with any of them.) What I was shocked to learn was where some of them originated.  Now, I'm a responsible American homestead-type so I want to support local businesses, and if not in my general locale, then I try to at least keep my dollars in the U. S.  Sometimes that's not possible in today's economy, but in the case of salt it is possible to keep it local.

Note the country where they are mined.  This is not always clear on packaging because manufacturers cleverly give the location where they are packaged then consumers take it that's where the product originated when in reality that is not the case. I've done a little research to make it simple for you to see where your healthy salt is from.
                        
        Pink or White Himalayan Salt - Pakistan          
All Himalayan salt comes from Pakistan.    

Celtic Sea Salt - Brittany region of France

Real Salt  (sea salt) - Utah, USA


I'll be buying USA salt henceforth.   How about you?

Have a great week, Y'all!
Shared at:  The Art Of Home-making Mondays, Farmgirl Friday Blog Hop

39 comments:

  1. Ouch! I have been using the pink as of late because I read they are the least contaminated because the sea salt has potential pollutants... But now... I wonder about this choice... Why is it that everything is so complicated these days! Yikes, thanks for pointing this out Toni! You are certainly worth your weight in salt :)

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    1. "You are certainly worth your weight in salt "
      *ROFL* Seriously, I can't stop laughing. That's a lot of salt.
      Thanks for the chuckle, JES.

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    2. Hey, this was a serious subject! :) I just had to add a bit of pizzazz to the end to soften it up... and that is what I came up with. Happy Monday to you!

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    3. Oh, I enjoyed the pizzazz, trust me. :)

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  2. i use very little salt (if any) in my food. i get too much of it from pre-packaged stuff. :)

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  3. How interesting, my friend. Thank you so much for sharing this helpful information. Hugs to you!

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    1. Hi Stephanie, I know it's not glamorous, but something I think we should consider. Thanks for stopping in. :)

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  4. some gourmet items do come from Europe but I won't be supporting Pakistan any longer-good post

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    1. Thank you, Kathy. I'm sure you can imagine my surprise when I found that out.

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  5. WOW!!! Had no idea!! Thanks for the info!! We need to support our own country more than ever.

    Charlotte Moore

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    1. I wholeheartedly agree Charlotte, and I'm glad you do, too. Thanks for stopping by. :)

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  6. I've always bought local salt --in my case, marine salt from Spanish "salinas" (salt ponds) that are high in iodine. Buying local is always the best choice. ;-)
    Stay warm!

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    1. Good for you, Alhana. Here we are inundated with basic things to buy that do not support our economy. And that's just one of the many reasons it's on the downhill slide.

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  7. The information about salt is very interesting. I learned things that I did not know. I also will buy salt from the USA!

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    1. I'm glad to hear that, Brenda! Thanks for stopping by.

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  8. Replies
    1. Thank you, it's a daily visitor to the birdbath. :)

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    1. You're welcome, and thanks for stopping by.

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  10. We try to buy American as much as we can too, it is hard when they say made in US but if you look harder you can see that the actual ingredients come from another country, really have to read that's for sure

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    1. Hi Connie! That's right, we have to be wary.

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  11. Toni, you've got my wheels turning now! I have talked about this with several others...the differences in the salts...I may have to write about this topic...and refer back to you, friend ;) Have a beautiful sunny day...very early spring is in the air here and the owls are nesting!
    ((Hugs)) in the Lord!

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    1. Jacqueline, I hope you will delve into the salt saga further. I just wasn't inclined to go any further into it right now. Looking forward to your article on the subject.

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  12. Interesting. I never thought of when buying salt, where did it originate from. I'm actually low on salt right now, so when I go to purchase, I'm going to look into that sea salt from Utah. Thanks for the info!

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  13. Pretty picture of the that sweet bluebird. Unfortunately, the only time I see bluebirds is when I'm out east on vacation. So sad that we don't see them here in Illinois that much anymore. The invasive species like house sparrows and starlings that take over their nesting boxes and kill their babies is why we see that decline here in Illinois.

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    1. Thank you, Kelly! Bluebirds are my all-time favorite birds. We have lots of sparrows and starlings too though.
      Thanks for stopping by.

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  14. I do use pink Himalayan Salt in my fermenting and while the majority of it may come Pakistan, I don't see why just because there are some bad elements (aka people just like in every country) I should shudder to use it. I use a variety of salts for various reasons for different applications. Some local, some not. Not everyone in Pakistan is "evil." Thanks for sharing at the (mis)Adventures Mondays Blog Hop. I can't wait to see what you share this week!

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    1. Mindie, you are free to buy salt as you like, of course. I can't imagine why you would think anyone has suggested you shudder to use your choice or why you bring the word "evil" into this conversation. You, dear Mindie, are the only person to bring that word up. That said, I stand by my resolve to support my own country whenever possible.
      Thanks for stopping by. :)

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  15. I had to go look-and needed a caffeine reload anyway-I use the big box of Diamond Crystal which says it is a product of the USA and is certified Kosher but it doesn't have iodine. The Culinary Arts teacher at the hs said it was the best and so I have used it ever since. I too try to buy as many things from the USA as possible. We stopped buying frozen Tilapia from Costco because it came from China and is fed crappy (literally) stuff. I know buy the fresh and freeze it myself. Thank-you so much for bringing up the subject! My computer has been on the fritz so didn't see this when it came out. Blessings to you this week!

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    1. I don't think we have Diamond Crystal here or I would probably buy it. My bringing up the subject has brought good reviews for the most part, lol.

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  16. Yikes to supporting Pakistan, and boo I was hoping the celtic salt would be Irish (my proud Irishman fiance would have loved that) we most use Kosher salt for cooking and then sea salt/himilyan for flavoring. Thanks for sharing at the Homestead Blog Hop, hope you'll be back again this week

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  17. Nicole, I was disappointed that Celtic sea salt has nothing to do with Ireland, too, as there's a wee bit of Irish blood in me veins. Thanks for stopping by.

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  18. (yes, your comments are some of the ones i'm not getting via email any longer! so frustrating! at least when i check the dashboard, i can see you were visiting!)

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  19. Thanks so much for stopping by!! Sorry it took so long to return the visit!!

    Hugs,
    Deb

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  20. ⋰˚هჱミ
    Passei para uma visita. Fotos lindas! A última imagem é encantadora.

    Bom domingo!
    Beijinhos.
    ❤♡ه° ·.

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  21. I have read a lot of good things about himalayan salt but have never bought any. I will stick with my sea salt.

    Have a great Sunday
    :)Vicki

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  22. I use American made sea salt. I never thought a lot about it, thanks for sharing the info,Phyllis

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  23. Browsing your posts here to see if I missed any...Interesting to learn about the different salts!

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Thank you for your comments!